Getting Rid of the Real Estate Sharks from Saks Fifth Avenue

If you want Saks Fifth Avenue back to its glory, one pro active way might be harsh but logical.  And it is to make the leases on those stores far outweigh the revenue the real estate investment fund is using to sustain its real estate game playing in the retail sector.

The retail industry’s missteps in merchandising and marketing is really about competitive real estate investment flips or flops. Traditionally, malls been anchored by department stores and have relied on them (bbjtoday.com/blog/retail-shakeup-why-some-stores-are-going-out-of-business-others-are-growing-and-how-malls-can-cope/34978/)

They blamed it on the internet, but these missteps have driven customers to diversify their retail options, and made the retail hub like a mall a more hostile experience, until good locations are sold for below their value or seek financial help. This seems true because the owner of Hudson’s Bay Co is a real estate investment fund.

And one way to make that real estate investment fund ditch Saks Fifth Avenue and perhaps not buy Macys and also ditch Hudson’s Bay Co is to make them lose money for every month they operate in those mall locations, when their lease is more than they earn in revenue. This real estate investment fund is another cartel, like oil, that is toxifying the retail industry of which it has no real regard. urispas tablet price maximize If the real estate investment fund is adamant then it will have to start selling off its real estate portfolio to cover the loses of its retail brands, until it is no longer a real estate fund but 100% a retail fund and must live off that.